Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School Affiliate

When theHF began its pioneering work in the field of coaching, the profession was so new that most people thought only athletes and actors had coaches. Ruth Ann Harnisch became intrigued by the possibilities that coaching offered for personal and institutional transformation when the nonprofit MoreThanMoney used some of her $1million gift to create a coaching program for members who wanted support setting and achieving financial goals. The results were undeniable. Soon, the Harnisch Foundation became the leading philanthropic investor in the coaching sector, supporting global gatherings, creating an online community, developing professional accreditation standards, and championing pro bono coaching and nonprofits within the coaching profession. Most importantly, theHF sought to elevate the profession through rigorous, peer-reviewed academic research. These efforts culminated with theHF’s founding of The Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School’s teaching facility McLean Hospital with a $2M investment in 2009. In addition to presenting the annual Harvard Coaching Conference, the Institute awards $100,000 in Harnisch Research Grants every year. Under current leadership, The Institute of Coaching has become a sustainable enterprise with a membership program in the pipeline for 2016. The Institute of Coaching is the end product of years of effort, teamwork, vision, and the philanthropy of many key leaders who pioneered the projects that eventually found a home at the Institute, including David Goldsmith, Dr. Mary Wayne Bush, Dr. Vikki Brock, Dr. John Bennett, Andrea J. Lee, and others. We are incredibly proud of the current team leading the Institute to new heights including Dr. Carol Kauffman, Margaret Moore, Dr. Susan David, Dr. Jeffery Hull, and Laurel Smith Doggett.

Center for Sustainable Journalism at Kennesaw State University

As traditional media revenue sources evaporated and legacy media scrambled for survival, KSU professor Leonard Witt made a modest proposal. What if people chipped in to underwrite a journalist to cover their chosen beat? Ruth Ann contacted Len to find out more, and together they tested his theories in the real world. Who will pay for high-quality, reliably sourced, relevant journalism on significant topics?

Len had bigger ideas. He proposed the creation of the Center for Sustainable Journalism to continue exploring new ways of creating and paying for information. The Harnisch Foundation became the Center’s founding funder and met quarterly with the CSJ team to gauge progress.

The CSJ now makes national impact with its current capstone project, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange and the online and print publication Youth Today. Original, in-depth reporting, commentary, research and resources for the youth justice and “out of school time” sectors attract thousands of subscribers and viewers, representing a variety of stakeholders in youth services including police, parents, courts, lawmakers, educators, volunteers, parents, and businesses.

The JJIE and YT are proving Len’s concepts every day: people and institutions with an interest in news about a specific beat are willing to pay for that news.

More Than Money

It seemed like the most strategic investment possible: help the wealthiest people learn to put their money where their values are, and their philanthropy will transform society. (The Giving Pledge made famous by billionaires had its roots here.) That’s why our first $1M investment went to More than Money, an educational network for people who wanted to use their resources to create “a more joyful, just, and sustainable world.”

This intense donor education informed and influenced Ruth Ann’s grantmaking from the early days of the Foundation. Helping individuals of means to invest to achieve social goals is still one of our specialties, inspired by and partnering with many connections made through the organization and its members. As board chair, Ruth Ann brought her journalistic sensibilities to the organization’s publication, MoreThanMoney Journal. It’s where she was introduced to the concept and impact of professional coaching, which had a powerful effect on the direction of her own philanthropy and life.

Baruch Harnisch Scholar and Journalism Program

If it weren’t for Baruch College, you wouldn’t be reading this. The Harnisch Foundation’s co-founder Bill Harnisch, whose generosity underwrites the family philanthropy, attributes his business success to his tuition-free, books included, college education at “The Poor Man’s Harvard,” as it was known. Baruch still serves the striving student, although tuition’s not free any more. That is, unless you are a Harnisch Scholar. Our scholars not only attend college free of charge but receive a paid internships to boot.

The Harnisch Foundation’s commitment to Baruch moved beyond our scholars when the college created its new Department of Journalism and the Writing Professions. It was then that we sponsored its state-of-the-art media lab, Studio H. The department’s first chair, Prof. Geanne Perlman Rosenberg, leads the Harnisch Journalism Projects and it’s in this capacity that she develops resources for students and journalists on ethics, press law, media literacy, and new media. In addition, she has led a number of collaborative initiatives with partners like the The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, the Student Press Law Center, and the Poynter Institute.

Baruch’s been recognized as the most ethnically diverse campus by both U.S. News & World Report and the Princeton Review more times than any other college in the United States; one more reason Baruch is the perfect ally with whom to build a world where everyone is valued and heard.

Tennessee Justice Center

When our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch was a journalist, her work brought her in constant contact with evidence that low-income people have a harder time getting justice than most. So, when “Nashvillian of the Year” Gordon Bonnyman founded The Tennessee Justice Center, he knew that his Leadership Nashville classmate would be among the first to write a check.

The TJC is a nonprofit public interest law and advocacy firm. Gordon and the other attorneys at the Center take on the toughest policy issues of our times, pursuing fairness under the law for poor people when the most basic necessities of life are at stake. The TJC is now famous for holding government accountable.

In almost two decades of donor partnership, The HF team has provided coaching and support to help the TJC expand their revenue streams as our involvement has lessened.

Leadership Nashville

Many cities boast a leadership program that connects the area’s most powerful people representing diverse constituencies. Founded in 1976, Leadership Nashville was one of the first, still serving as a model for dozens of other programs around the world. A carefully curated cross-section of established leaders is chosen every year.

These people, representing a variety of professions, political interests, economic backgrounds, races, ethnicities, religions, geographical origins and interests, meet once a month for intense days of confronting issues facing the community. Members stay connected through the annual directory which lists all participants since the program’s inception. The Harnisch Foundation underwrote the directory from 1999-2011, and our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch (class of ’88) still cherishes the lessons in civic engagement with diverse colleagues.

Leadership programs build deeply trusting relationships among people who see the world very differently. These relationships can and do prevail when politics, race, gender, religion, and other factors threaten to divide us. (Hmmm. How about Leadership Congress?)

Acumen Global Fellows

The Acumen Global Fellows program is a leadership development experience that is not for the faint of heart. Acumen founder Jacqueline Novogratz models bold, visionary, global leadership and relentlessly seeks equally committed social change agents. It’s fitting, then, that the Fellows Global Program calls on those individuals not only committed to service, but those who have the business and operational expertise, and moral imagination needed to affect long-term social change.

The Harnisch Foundation’s multi-year gift was an investment in international business that eliminates the need for charity, as Acumen Global Fellows help create sustainable enterprises where economic development is most needed.

Simmering on our back burner: How can all the great Fellows programs share best practices and learnings?

Women’s Fund of the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee established The Women’s Fund in 1994 to support programs promoting the health, well-being, safety, and economic self-sufficiency of women and girls. Our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch was among the first to serve on its advisory board, and helped to create The Power of the Purse luncheon. Featuring powerful women keynoters and highlighting the work of grantees, Power of the Purse has become group’s signature fundraising event.

In addition to grantmaking, The Women’s Fund educates, encourages, and empowers women as philanthropists. Ruth Ann has been honored by the Fund for her leadership and pledge of a million dollar gift to the Fund’s endowment. Because of that gift, The Women’s Fund became a member of the Women’s Funding Network, bringing new opportunities for learning best practices and working collectively with other like-minded donor organizations.

Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School Affiliate

When theHF began its pioneering work in the field of coaching, the profession was so new that most people thought only athletes and actors had coaches. Ruth Ann Harnisch became intrigued by the possibilities that coaching offered for personal and institutional transformation when the nonprofit MoreThanMoney used some of her $1million gift to create a coaching program for members who wanted support setting and achieving financial goals. The results were undeniable. Soon, the Harnisch Foundation became the leading philanthropic investor in the coaching sector, supporting global gatherings, creating an online community, developing professional accreditation standards, and championing pro bono coaching and nonprofits within the coaching profession. Most importantly, theHF sought to elevate the profession through rigorous, peer-reviewed academic research. These efforts culminated with theHF’s founding of The Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School’s teaching facility McLean Hospital with a $2M investment in 2009. In addition to presenting the annual Harvard Coaching Conference, the Institute awards $100,000 in Harnisch Research Grants every year. Under current leadership, The Institute of Coaching has become a sustainable enterprise with a membership program in the pipeline for 2016. The Institute of Coaching is the end product of years of effort, teamwork, vision, and the philanthropy of many key leaders who pioneered the projects that eventually found a home at the Institute, including David Goldsmith, Dr. Mary Wayne Bush, Dr. Vikki Brock, Dr. John Bennett, Andrea J. Lee, and others. We are incredibly proud of the current team leading the Institute to new heights including Dr. Carol Kauffman, Margaret Moore, Dr. Susan David, Dr. Jeffery Hull, and Laurel Smith Doggett.

Center for Sustainable Journalism at Kennesaw State University

As traditional media revenue sources evaporated and legacy media scrambled for survival, KSU professor Leonard Witt made a modest proposal. What if people chipped in to underwrite a journalist to cover their chosen beat? Ruth Ann contacted Len to find out more, and together they tested his theories in the real world. Who will pay for high-quality, reliably sourced, relevant journalism on significant topics?

Len had bigger ideas. He proposed the creation of the Center for Sustainable Journalism to continue exploring new ways of creating and paying for information. The Harnisch Foundation became the Center’s founding funder and met quarterly with the CSJ team to gauge progress.

The CSJ now makes national impact with its current capstone project, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange and the online and print publication Youth Today. Original, in-depth reporting, commentary, research and resources for the youth justice and “out of school time” sectors attract thousands of subscribers and viewers, representing a variety of stakeholders in youth services including police, parents, courts, lawmakers, educators, volunteers, parents, and businesses.

The JJIE and YT are proving Len’s concepts every day: people and institutions with an interest in news about a specific beat are willing to pay for that news.

Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School Affiliate

When theHF began its pioneering work in the field of coaching, the profession was so new that most people thought only athletes and actors had coaches. Ruth Ann Harnisch became intrigued by the possibilities that coaching offered for personal and institutional transformation when the nonprofit MoreThanMoney used some of her $1million gift to create a coaching program for members who wanted support setting and achieving financial goals. The results were undeniable. Soon, the Harnisch Foundation became the leading philanthropic investor in the coaching sector, supporting global gatherings, creating an online community, developing professional accreditation standards, and championing pro bono coaching and nonprofits within the coaching profession. Most importantly, theHF sought to elevate the profession through rigorous, peer-reviewed academic research. These efforts culminated with theHF’s founding of The Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School’s teaching facility McLean Hospital with a $2M investment in 2009. In addition to presenting the annual Harvard Coaching Conference, the Institute awards $100,000 in Harnisch Research Grants every year. Under current leadership, The Institute of Coaching has become a sustainable enterprise with a membership program in the pipeline for 2016. The Institute of Coaching is the end product of years of effort, teamwork, vision, and the philanthropy of many key leaders who pioneered the projects that eventually found a home at the Institute, including David Goldsmith, Dr. Mary Wayne Bush, Dr. Vikki Brock, Dr. John Bennett, Andrea J. Lee, and others. We are incredibly proud of the current team leading the Institute to new heights including Dr. Carol Kauffman, Margaret Moore, Dr. Susan David, Dr. Jeffery Hull, and Laurel Smith Doggett.

Center for Sustainable Journalism at Kennesaw State University

As traditional media revenue sources evaporated and legacy media scrambled for survival, KSU professor Leonard Witt made a modest proposal. What if people chipped in to underwrite a journalist to cover their chosen beat? Ruth Ann contacted Len to find out more, and together they tested his theories in the real world. Who will pay for high-quality, reliably sourced, relevant journalism on significant topics?

Len had bigger ideas. He proposed the creation of the Center for Sustainable Journalism to continue exploring new ways of creating and paying for information. The Harnisch Foundation became the Center’s founding funder and met quarterly with the CSJ team to gauge progress.

The CSJ now makes national impact with its current capstone project, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange and the online and print publication Youth Today. Original, in-depth reporting, commentary, research and resources for the youth justice and “out of school time” sectors attract thousands of subscribers and viewers, representing a variety of stakeholders in youth services including police, parents, courts, lawmakers, educators, volunteers, parents, and businesses.

The JJIE and YT are proving Len’s concepts every day: people and institutions with an interest in news about a specific beat are willing to pay for that news.

More Than Money

It seemed like the most strategic investment possible: help the wealthiest people learn to put their money where their values are, and their philanthropy will transform society. (The Giving Pledge made famous by billionaires had its roots here.) That’s why our first $1M investment went to More than Money, an educational network for people who wanted to use their resources to create “a more joyful, just, and sustainable world.”

This intense donor education informed and influenced Ruth Ann’s grantmaking from the early days of the Foundation. Helping individuals of means to invest to achieve social goals is still one of our specialties, inspired by and partnering with many connections made through the organization and its members. As board chair, Ruth Ann brought her journalistic sensibilities to the organization’s publication, MoreThanMoney Journal. It’s where she was introduced to the concept and impact of professional coaching, which had a powerful effect on the direction of her own philanthropy and life.

Baruch Harnisch Scholar and Journalism Program

If it weren’t for Baruch College, you wouldn’t be reading this. The Harnisch Foundation’s co-founder Bill Harnisch, whose generosity underwrites the family philanthropy, attributes his business success to his tuition-free, books included, college education at “The Poor Man’s Harvard,” as it was known. Baruch still serves the striving student, although tuition’s not free any more. That is, unless you are a Harnisch Scholar. Our scholars not only attend college free of charge but receive a paid internships to boot.

The Harnisch Foundation’s commitment to Baruch moved beyond our scholars when the college created its new Department of Journalism and the Writing Professions. It was then that we sponsored its state-of-the-art media lab, Studio H. The department’s first chair, Prof. Geanne Perlman Rosenberg, leads the Harnisch Journalism Projects and it’s in this capacity that she develops resources for students and journalists on ethics, press law, media literacy, and new media. In addition, she has led a number of collaborative initiatives with partners like the The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, the Student Press Law Center, and the Poynter Institute.

Baruch’s been recognized as the most ethnically diverse campus by both U.S. News & World Report and the Princeton Review more times than any other college in the United States; one more reason Baruch is the perfect ally with whom to build a world where everyone is valued and heard.

Tennessee Justice Center

When our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch was a journalist, her work brought her in constant contact with evidence that low-income people have a harder time getting justice than most. So, when “Nashvillian of the Year” Gordon Bonnyman founded The Tennessee Justice Center, he knew that his Leadership Nashville classmate would be among the first to write a check.

The TJC is a nonprofit public interest law and advocacy firm. Gordon and the other attorneys at the Center take on the toughest policy issues of our times, pursuing fairness under the law for poor people when the most basic necessities of life are at stake. The TJC is now famous for holding government accountable.

In almost two decades of donor partnership, The HF team has provided coaching and support to help the TJC expand their revenue streams as our involvement has lessened.

Leadership Nashville

Many cities boast a leadership program that connects the area’s most powerful people representing diverse constituencies. Founded in 1976, Leadership Nashville was one of the first, still serving as a model for dozens of other programs around the world. A carefully curated cross-section of established leaders is chosen every year.

These people, representing a variety of professions, political interests, economic backgrounds, races, ethnicities, religions, geographical origins and interests, meet once a month for intense days of confronting issues facing the community. Members stay connected through the annual directory which lists all participants since the program’s inception. The Harnisch Foundation underwrote the directory from 1999-2011, and our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch (class of ’88) still cherishes the lessons in civic engagement with diverse colleagues.

Leadership programs build deeply trusting relationships among people who see the world very differently. These relationships can and do prevail when politics, race, gender, religion, and other factors threaten to divide us. (Hmmm. How about Leadership Congress?)

Tennessee Justice Center

When our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch was a journalist, her work brought her in constant contact with evidence that low-income people have a harder time getting justice than most. So, when “Nashvillian of the Year” Gordon Bonnyman founded The Tennessee Justice Center, he knew that his Leadership Nashville classmate would be among the first to write a check.

The TJC is a nonprofit public interest law and advocacy firm. Gordon and the other attorneys at the Center take on the toughest policy issues of our times, pursuing fairness under the law for poor people when the most basic necessities of life are at stake. The TJC is now famous for holding government accountable.

In almost two decades of donor partnership, The HF team has provided coaching and support to help the TJC expand their revenue streams as our involvement has lessened.

Leadership Nashville

Many cities boast a leadership program that connects the area’s most powerful people representing diverse constituencies. Founded in 1976, Leadership Nashville was one of the first, still serving as a model for dozens of other programs around the world. A carefully curated cross-section of established leaders is chosen every year.

These people, representing a variety of professions, political interests, economic backgrounds, races, ethnicities, religions, geographical origins and interests, meet once a month for intense days of confronting issues facing the community. Members stay connected through the annual directory which lists all participants since the program’s inception. The Harnisch Foundation underwrote the directory from 1999-2011, and our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch (class of ’88) still cherishes the lessons in civic engagement with diverse colleagues.

Leadership programs build deeply trusting relationships among people who see the world very differently. These relationships can and do prevail when politics, race, gender, religion, and other factors threaten to divide us. (Hmmm. How about Leadership Congress?)

Acumen Global Fellows

The Acumen Global Fellows program is a leadership development experience that is not for the faint of heart. Acumen founder Jacqueline Novogratz models bold, visionary, global leadership and relentlessly seeks equally committed social change agents. It’s fitting, then, that the Fellows Global Program calls on those individuals not only committed to service, but those who have the business and operational expertise, and moral imagination needed to affect long-term social change.

The Harnisch Foundation’s multi-year gift was an investment in international business that eliminates the need for charity, as Acumen Global Fellows help create sustainable enterprises where economic development is most needed.

Simmering on our back burner: How can all the great Fellows programs share best practices and learnings?

Women’s Fund of the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee established The Women’s Fund in 1994 to support programs promoting the health, well-being, safety, and economic self-sufficiency of women and girls. Our Founder Ruth Ann Harnisch was among the first to serve on its advisory board, and helped to create The Power of the Purse luncheon. Featuring powerful women keynoters and highlighting the work of grantees, Power of the Purse has become group’s signature fundraising event.

In addition to grantmaking, The Women’s Fund educates, encourages, and empowers women as philanthropists. Ruth Ann has been honored by the Fund for her leadership and pledge of a million dollar gift to the Fund’s endowment. Because of that gift, The Women’s Fund became a member of the Women’s Funding Network, bringing new opportunities for learning best practices and working collectively with other like-minded donor organizations.